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This week, Israeli Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu told his ministers to stop having discussions with their Palestinian counterparts. The peace talks were brokered by the United States Government, however are on the verge of collapse following Palestine’s attempts to join the United Nations, which Israel says is a “provocative” move.

This is a massive move by the Israeli Prime Minister, as the two nations work incredibly closely being in the same geographical area, and it begs the question how the two-state nation will work. As we know, both nations dislike each other so it is unlikely one will fold and give the other an upper hand, meaning there could be terrible consequences.

Another reason why it is a big move, is because there have been many peace attempts over the past few years, and although we could say none have fully worked, it has kept full scale war away, which is what could happen from this situation. As the book states, the first signs of peace came in 1993 at the declaration of principles, where there  was an image of the Palestinian Liberation Organisation (PLO) leader, Yasar Arafat shaking hands with Israeli Prime Minister Itzhak Rabin, which was said to put at end to decades of confrontation and conflict.

This trend of peace attempts has continued ever since, which makes this article of banning talks between the two countries even more surprising, especially when just last week, Netanyahu actually stated that he wanted peace with the Palestinians.

After Netanyahu’s statements, it will be both interesting and scary to see how this situation progresses.

Arafat and Rabin in 1993, showing that peace between Palestine and Israel is possible

Arafat and Rabin in 1993, showing that peace between Palestine and Israel is possible

The struggle has gone on for over 60 years, following World War Two, and I found this image very interesting, at how even public opinion was, and even more interested that more Australians are with the Palestinians than the Israelis.

The struggle has gone on for over 60 years, following World War Two, and I found this image very interesting, at how even public opinion was, and even more interested that more Australians are with the Palestinians than the Israelis on the Gaza Strip Conflict.

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